CHRIS PROWSE | WELLINGTON MUSICIAN

NEW ALBUM: SWEET THE BLEEP OUT NOW

E

LISTEN HERE

Wellington musician Chris Prowse has followed up on his two previous albums – Tui Award winning Trouble on the Waterfront (about the 1951 waterfront lockout) and There Goes the Shiner (based on John A. Lee’s stories about the rouseabout Shiner Slattery) – with Sweet the Bleep, an album of instrumental compositions for guitars.

“Sweet the Bleep explores the versatility of the instrument, using mainly electric guitars, while being influenced  by some of Prowse’s favourites, Kenny Burrell, Hanno Busch, and even the film composer Ennio Morricone.

The album starts with three short related pieces inspired by the natural wonders of Fiordland. Overall the compositions have touches of jazz, son Cubano, folk, plus the abstract. There is one cover tune – Kenny Burrell’s “Soul Lament arranged as a duet for guitar and harmonica.

The musicians are: Chris Prowse (guitars, el tres Cubano, synths, and timpani), Richard Prowse (double bass), Andrew Delahunty (harmonica) and Eva Prowse (synthesizer). The album was recorded by Chris Prowse, and mixed and mastered by Robbie Duncan.

Wellington musician Chris Prowse has followed up on his two previous albums – Tui Award winning Trouble on the Waterfront (about the 1951 waterfront lockout) and There Goes the Shiner (based on John A. Lee’s stories about the rouseabout Shiner Slattery) – with Sweet the Bleep, an album of instrumental compositions for guitars.

Sweet the Bleep explores the versatility of the instrument, using mainly electric guitars, while being influenced  by some of Prowse’s favourites, Kenny Burrell, Hanno Busch, and even the film composer Ennio Morricone.

The album starts with three short related pieces inspired by the natural wonders of Fiordland. Overall the compositions have touches of jazz, son Cubano, folk, plus the abstract. There is one cover tune – Kenny Burrell’s “Soul Lament” arranged as a duet for guitar and harmonica.

The musicians are: Chris Prowse (guitars, el tres Cubano, synths, and timpani), Richard Prowse (double bass), Andrew Delahunty (harmonica) and Eva Prowse (synthesizer). The album was recorded by Chris Prowse, and mixed and mastered by Robbie Duncan.

DISCOGRAPHY

SWEET THE BLEEP

Music for the guitar with touches of jazz, son Cubano, folk and the abstract.

 

E

LISTEN HERE

THERE GOES THE SHINER

An album inspired by the John A. Lee stories about the swagman Ned Slattery.

 

E

LISTEN HERE

TROUBLE ON THE WATERFRONT

The album is a collection of original songs about the 1951 New Zealand waterfront lockout.

 

E

LISTEN HERE

FIVE SONGS

A 2007 EP by Chris and daughter Eva. The track “Good Morning Baby” has been a regular on the National Radio playlist

 

E

LISTEN HERE

PUBLICATIONS

SWEET THE BLEEP GUITAR SHEET MUSIC

Here is the sheet music for a few of the guitar instrumentals from Sweet the Bleep.

Download here:

At the End of the Day
Doubtful Sound
Deep Cove
Sweet the Bleep
Holy Molsky

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Below is a free file of the update of my book – Financial Management for the Performing Arts. This handbook is intended for both practitioners and students. My thanks to the New Zealand Drama School/Toi Whakaari and Playmarket for their support.

Download here:

Financial Management for the Performing Arts 2015 (pdf)

NEW ZEALAND RECORDED MUSIC REVENUES

Is the New Zealand music recording industry on a roll, or is it still shrinking? Read my opinion.

Download here.

Graph of recorded music revenues in NZ: 2001-2018. Sharp increase of streaming revenue.

BIO

The way I learnt to play the guitar was by moving the needle back and forth over the tracks of my favourite album Mississippi John Hurt Today! I was intrigued how he could play a melody line and bass accompaniment at the same time. I just about wore a hole through the vinyl before I figured it out.

While at University I started performing as a folk musician playing in various Wellington coffee bars.

At the time I was studying accountancy…

READ MORE

… This was not a very cool thing to do in the early 70s if you hung out with hippy musicians. However, getting an accounting degree did lead to some interesting “day jobs” – first in theatre administration, and then film and broadcasting. Later on it led to a number of board appointments in the performing arts and screen production, as well as teaching and consultancy work.

Over the years I’ve continued with my “night job”, playing with lots of wonderful musician friends and family members, writing music, recording – and being a partner in an independent record label until music streaming came along making recorded music a labour of love.

I count myself lucky to have had rewarding day jobs – but equally, if you want to nourish your soul, the moral of this little tale is – don’t give up your night job!

My first two solo albums combined music with New Zealand social history. A musical highlight was receiving a New Zealand Music Award (Tui) for my 2009 album – Trouble on the Waterfront – about the 1951 New Zealand waterfront lockout.

Lately, I’ve concentrated on writing music for the guitar, exploring various genres. There is more freedom when writing instrumental music compared to writing songs which is limited by vocal range. The downside is missing out on the fun of writing lyrics.

If you like to play guitar instrumentals then check out the sheet music downloads for some of the tunes on Sweet the Bleep. The sheet music may not always match the recordings note for note, but hey, that’s jazz.

BIO

The way I learnt to play the guitar was by moving the needle back and forth over the tracks of my favourite album Mississippi John Hurt Today! I was intrigued how he could play a melody line and bass accompaniment at the same time. I just about wore a hole through the vinyl before I figured it out.

While at University I started performing as a folk musician playing in various Wellington coffee bars.

At the time I was studying accountancy…

READ MORE

… This was not a very cool thing to do in the early 70s if you hung out with hippy musicians. However, getting an accounting degree did lead to some interesting “day jobs” – first in theatre administration, and then film and broadcasting. Later on it led to a number of board appointments in the performing arts and screen production, as well as teaching and consultancy work.

Over the years I’ve continued with my “night job”, playing with lots of wonderful musician friends and family members, writing music, recording – and being a partner in an independent record label until music streaming came along making recorded music a labour of love.

I count myself lucky to have had rewarding day jobs – but equally, if you want to nourish your soul, the moral of this little tale is – don’t give up your night job!

My first two solo albums combined music with New Zealand social history. A musical highlight was receiving a New Zealand Music Award (Tui) for my 2009 album – Trouble on the Waterfront – about the 1951 New Zealand waterfront lockout.

Lately, I’ve concentrated on writing music for the guitar, exploring various genres. There is more freedom when writing instrumental music compared to writing songs which is limited by vocal range. The downside is missing out on the fun of writing lyrics.

If you like to play guitar instrumentals then check out the sheet music downloads for some of the tunes on Sweet the Bleep. The sheet music may not always match the recordings note for note, but hey, that’s jazz.

SWEET THE BLEEP

“Something rather different this time from guitarist/songwriter Prowse …Here he offers 10 gentle electric guitar pieces… In a shouty world this is quiet conversation in a warm, fire-lit room.”

GRAHAM REID, ELSEWHERE.CO.NZ

TUI AWARD WINNER –
TROUBLE ON THE WATERFRONT

“Prowse brings that older tradition back to life with an album which works just fine in the stereo but also deserves a multi-media stage presentation…”

ELSEWHERE.CO.NZ

THERE GOES THE SHINER

“Atmospheric tunes that call forth pioneering days of gold rushes, swagmen, remittance men, and a love of wandering the rough native lands. Nostalgic without being sentimental.”

WCL MUSIC

GET IN TOUCH

ENQUIRY

5 + 5 =


ENQUIRY

14 + 8 =